A Separate Peace

A Separate Peace

America is binging on outrage because liberals are arrogant elitists recklessly opening our borders and bankrupting the country, while conservatives are hateful bigots bent on destroying the environment and oppressing poor people.
Neither statement is true, but both stereotypes feed the outrage addiction that has become the default narrative of public dialogue.

Oprah’s Curse

Oprah’s Curse

Oprah’s Curse A decade later, city seeks answers for homeless By R.E. Graswich September 2019 It all started with Oprah. In February 2009, the TV talk show icon sent reporter Lisa Ling to a homeless camp called “tent city” near the American River and Sutter’s Landing....
Homeless Solutions

Homeless Solutions

I first learned about Haven for Hope, a unique homeless facility in San Antonio, Texas, from a close friend, Jill McDonnell. Jill is a professional photographer. Her passion is capturing extraordinary images of homeless people in Sacramento.

Not Humane

Not Humane

The homelessness problem keeps getting worse.

A survey released June 26 found Sacramento County’s homeless count jumped 19 percent the past two years, to an estimated 5,570. A study released three weeks earlier found Los Angeles County’s homeless population rose 12 percent in the past year, to almost 59,000—despite massive new spending to combat the crisis.

California is home to almost 25 percent of the nation’s homeless population, yet makes up only 12 percent of the total population.

Homeless Numbers Jump

Homeless Numbers Jump

Homeless Numbers Jump BUT MAYOR SEES HOPE IN CITY’S RESPONSE TO CRISIS By Darrell Steinberg July 2019 This past week we received some sobering but hopeful news about homelessness in our city and county. The results from the latest count of Sacramento’s homeless...
Strong Mayor Deja Vu

Strong Mayor Deja Vu

A decade ago, many Sacramento residents were outraged when Mayor Kevin Johnson tried to make himself a “strong mayor.”

Johnson wanted to change the city charter and allow the mayor to serve as City Hall’s chief executive. He would have veto power over City Council decisions. The city manager and staff would answer to him.