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Did Measure G Supporter Skim State Funds?

A prominent supporter of Measure G, the Sacramento Children’s Fund Act on the March 3 ballot, will pay state authorities $400,000 to settle a lawsuit for allegedly taking public money from migrant housing and spending it on restaurants, hotels, taxes and other personal expenses while overcharging farmworkers for rent.

Derrell and Tina Roberts, married co-founders of the Roberts Family Development Center of North Sacramento, quietly settled a lawsuit in August filed by State Attorney General Xavier Becerra. The settlement allows the Roberts to avoid a trial.

Running For Change

Katie Valenzuela saw people struggling to pay rent and buy groceries. She saw taxes going up. She heard promises from City Hall. But the promises were empty. And the problems got worse.

For solutions, she looked to her City Council member, Steve Hansen. She heard only excuses.

Working Wonders

One of the most important questions I recall from childhood is, “What are you going to be when you grow up?” The question was not necessarily about jobs and pay. It was about life. Choosing a field of work defines who we are and how we live. It’s about what we accomplish and achieve.

The opposite of work is not leisure or play. It’s idleness. The philosopher Aristotle declared happiness resides in activity, both physical and mental. People who lack the joy of work—the feeling of a job well done—miss something important.

Seasonal Bounty

Think back to 2006. What do you think Sacramento saw itself as nearly a decade and a half ago? Where did you see Sacramento’s dining scene? Was farm-to-fork even on your radar?

In 2006, Heather Fargo sat as mayor, Kevin Martin led the kings in scoring and Patrick Mulvaney had a clear-eyed vision of what made the dining scene in Sacramento special. He recognized our rich agricultural legacy and year-round seasonal bounty, things we locals took for granted, as unique and something to be celebrated.

Diamonds In The Rough

Sacramento has had its very own rare gem in Blue Diamond Almonds since 1910 when Blue Diamond Growers made its headquarters at 1802 C St.

When early California pioneers discovered that the soil and climate surrounding the Sacramento area was ideal for growing almonds, it spurred the launch of a grower-owned cooperative—the California Almond Growers Exchange.

Artful Surroundings

Past the glass lobby doors, you’re greeted by stunning artwork from famed San Francisco artist William Gatewood (1943–1994). Large images of kimonos and Japanese screens, enhanced by splashes of gold and silver leaf, are displayed on the walls.

Further into the building, take a stroll along the Sacramento River Delta, courtesy of landscape paintings by legendary local artist Gregory Kondos.

Working Wonders

Working Wonders

Friends of East Sacramento has two immediate paid part-time job openings—garden manager and volunteer coordinator—at the McKinley Rose Garden. After many years of dedicated volunteer and paid service, Lyn Pitts, who worked both jobs, is retiring this month.

Truth Serum

Truth Serum

The Big Dig planned in Pocket and Greenhaven by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will intimidate residents. The Corps and its contractors are chopping down trees, cutting deep into the Sacramento River levee and building an underground wall to hold back floodwaters. Hundreds of trucks will haul dirt through local neighborhoods. Traffic will snarl. Tempers will boil.

But help is here. The volunteers who comprise the Pocket Greenhaven Community Association are determined to make the levee repair project easy to understand and navigate. They are planning a community forum where questions can be answered and facts provided.

Dining

Seasonal Bounty

Seasonal Bounty

Think back to 2006. What do you think Sacramento saw itself as nearly a decade and a half ago? Where did you see Sacramento’s dining scene? Was farm-to-fork even on your radar?

In 2006, Heather Fargo sat as mayor, Kevin Martin led the kings in scoring and Patrick Mulvaney had a clear-eyed vision of what made the dining scene in Sacramento special. He recognized our rich agricultural legacy and year-round seasonal bounty, things we locals took for granted, as unique and something to be celebrated.

Bring Your Appetite

Bring Your Appetite

Jose Silva has a thing for burgers. “If we can put it on a bun, we’ll serve it,” says Silva, owner of Flaming Grill Café. Whether it’s sirloin, chuck, bison, ostrich, elk, alligator, carnitas or ahi tuna, you’ll find it on the menu at one of Silva’s three locations.

Chef and owner, Silva has spent the majority of his life, almost 35 years, in the kitchen. Starting out washing dishes at age 13, he steadily worked his way through a variety of Sacramento restaurants, finally giving up the game a dozen years ago. But like a professional athlete who just can’t hang up the cleats, Silva found himself back on the field when he stumbled upon an opportunity to buy up an awkward little food stand on El Camino Avenue. Less than one year into his sabbatical and he was back at the grill, the only difference this time was that it was his grill.

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