Gone Not Forgotten

Gone Not Forgotten

In March, neighbors in East Sacramento were stunned to learn 33rd Street Bistro was closing, six months before the 25th anniversary of its opening in 1995. The East Sacramento restaurant was forced to shut down after the new landlord opted for another tenant, co-owner Matt Haines says.
I feel a special bond with 33rd Street Bistro and its owners, brothers Matt and Fred Haines, who were born and raised in Sacramento. My husband and I started our business that same year. The Haines family has continually advertised with Inside Sacramento since the Bistro opened. They were one of our beloved “lifetime” advertisers.

Take the 100% Local Pledge!

Take the 100% Local Pledge!

Inside Sacramento provides readers with 100 percent local content unavailable elsewhere. When the massive small-business shutdown was ordered throughout California, my thoughts first went to the many small business owners who support our publications.

Our readers know that our publishing business champions the local community in all its various elements. And many neighbors have taken the heed to support all things local.

Payback Time

Payback Time

Publishing a monthly magazine isn’t optimal when information about the coronavirus changes hourly. So most of what you see this month in Inside Sacramento will ideally serve as a welcome and necessary contrast to media approaches that prize speed over accuracy and are intended to generate extreme emotions.

Here we love our neighborhoods because their scale is small. Our relationships tend to be more intimate than what a big city or rural community might offer.

Mental Awareness

Mental Awareness

Almost a year ago, Inside Sacramento began monthly coverage of the homeless problem in our area. A key focus has been the root causes of homelessness, including mental health and drug and alcohol addiction.

In my May 2019 column, “Is Sacramento Dying?” Sacramento City Councilmember Jeff Harris said he favored an individual triage process to help understand the paths that bring people to the streets. His goal is to avoid placing folks who are simply unable to afford or find shelter in the same category as addicts, criminals and the mentally ill.

Working Wonders

Working Wonders

One of the most important questions I recall from childhood is, “What are you going to be when you grow up?” The question was not necessarily about jobs and pay. It was about life. Choosing a field of work defines who we are and how we live. It’s about what we accomplish and achieve.

The opposite of work is not leisure or play. It’s idleness. The philosopher Aristotle declared happiness resides in activity, both physical and mental. People who lack the joy of work—the feeling of a job well done—miss something important.

Losing The News

Losing The News

In the past decade, news outlets across the country have been gutted and closed, reporters laid off, and publication schedules cut. In 2018, more than 200 news publications closed their doors. There are now huge swathes of our country without local news coverage. They are called “news deserts.”

Locally, we face the same trend. The Sacramento Bee, our largest local news organization, had 9,000 employees a decade ago. Today it’s down to 2,800. But even with a skeleton reporting staff, the Bee remains a primary source for local news. The paper’s work filters across to other media, including television and radio.