Have Fun. Get It Done’

Have Fun. Get It Done’

In 1921, when women were not allowed to join male community groups in Oakland, 80 women signed a charter for the first Soroptimist Club, of and for women.

Not far behind Oakland, Soroptimist International of Sacramento was chartered in 1923.

Now global, 72,000 members in 121 countries belong to this volunteer service organization. Celebrating 100 years, Sacramento’s club is the fourth oldest active soroptimist club in the world.

‘We Can Do This!’

‘We Can Do This!’

The future may be female, but author Christine Hunter is here to remind us so was the past.

Hunter’s new book, “We Can Do This! Sacramento’s Trailblazing Political Women and the Community They Shaped,” released last year, profiles dozens of women who led Sacramento from the 1970s into the 2000s.

The names are locally renowned: Anne Rudin, the city’s first elected female mayor; Kim Mueller, former City Council member and now a federal judge; and Lauren Hammond, the first Black woman elected to the City Council.

No Sitting Still

No Sitting Still

Clive Savacool has a hard time sitting still.

For the first time in years, he only has one responsibility—running LogRx, the narcotics tracking app he co-founded for paramedics—instead of countless demands as a fire chief.

“As a fire chief, you’re always in crisis mode,” says the 44-year-old who lives in Sierra Oaks after resigning from South Lake Tahoe Fire Rescue last May. “Every day is a form of damage control. You can make great progress forward, but your to-do list is going to be bigger at the end of the day no matter how much you get done.”

This School Works

This School Works

When the alarm goes off in the morning, Kate Coulouras has good reason to get out of bed.

“The kids are my purpose,” says Coulouras, in her third year as principal of Cristo Rey High School at Jackson and Florin-Perkins roads.

“These kids work so hard and face obstacles I can’t imagine having to face in high school. Their work ethic is phenomenal. Their families are also fabulous and committed to wanting to learn and support their kids. They’ve made huge sacrifices for them to be able to be here. That really drives me to be creative and solve problems. The students deserve the absolute best education.”

Creative Method

Creative Method

Creative Method Trio helps frame, pack, deliver and install art By Cecily Hastings December 2022 Creating and producing art is one thing. When it’s showtime, art needs help. Three colleagues and friends, each with experience in art, framing and installation, have a...
Coming To Terms

Coming To Terms

Maia Evrigenis could not have known her battle with adolescent cancer would be universal, but that’s what happened when her fictional memoir “Neon Jane” was published by Koehler Books this past May.

“As a cancer survivor, I felt like I was living in a different body,” says the Arden Arcade resident, who was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia at age 13. “Other people didn’t have bodies that made cancer cells. I felt weird and alone about being different, and that’s the part of the book people tell me they relate to the most. It’s given me the sense that my extremely personal experience is actually very universal.”