How To Create a Stress-Free Summer

How To Create a Stress-Free Summer

When school’s out for the summer, you might imagine that parents would breathe a sigh of relief—but you’d be wrong. Planning your child’s summer camp schedule can be even more stressful than keeping up with the regular school year, as Arden-Arcade resident DJ Waldow can attest.

“Three summers ago, I was trying to plan my kids’ summer camp schedule,” says Waldow, who has a 10-year-old, 8-year-old and 5-year-old twins with his wife, a high-risk OB doctor. “The process was so crazy—you’d build a schedule, then go to each individual site and cross your fingers that they still had openings. Camps filled up really quickly, which was stressful, plus trying to coordinate our kids going to the same camp as their friends was very, very complicated. There was no simple, easy way to find different camps in Sacramento.”

Experience a Street Show with Dinorah Klingler

Experience a Street Show with Dinorah Klingler

What can performers do during a lockdown when they can’t reach a live audience? Dinorah Klingler, who simply goes by Dinorah, set up a stage in front of her Pocket home.

For three months, the popular Latina musician and producer of regional mariachi festivals has entertained neighbors and friends. Once a week, her cul-de-sac comes alive with joyful singing and dancing in the street—all with social distancing. Count me as a fan.

Learning To Relax

Learning To Relax

Many children live with stress. According to a peer-reviewed study in The Journal of Pediatrics in 2016, 7.1 percent of American kids 7 to 13 years old, or 4.4 million, had anxiety problems. Some show it. Others do not.

What can parents do to help make their children’s lives less stressful? Anti-anxiety medication is one treatment option; however, there are side effects to consider. Fortunately, other options exist. One is hypnosis. Just ask John Zulli, Ph.D., a clinical hypnosis practitioner based in Sacramento, with 34 years of experience.

Why opt for hypnosis to help kids reduce their anxiety level? “In hypnosis, children in part learn how to relax, mentally and physically,” Zulli says. “In this way, kids learn how to shift their energy from a fight-or-flight mindset to one of balance and peace.”

Catch Some Air

Catch Some Air

In 2015, sisters Brianna and Kristine Tesauro were just like any other 20somethings. Brianna—the elder by four years—was working in hospitality and volunteering. Kristine was employed at a raw food café and saving up for college to become a teacher. But that April, everything changed.

After experiencing unexplained fevers for weeks, Kristine finally went to the hospital for a checkup at the behest of a concerned roommate. That night saved her life. Kristine discovered she had leukemia. Had she waited two more days to go in, she wouldn’t have survived.

Same Name Game

Same Name Game

Like many baseball fans, Walt Yost enjoys poking around the cobwebbed cellars of baseball history. He’s a member of the Dusty Baker Sacramento chapter of the Society for American Baseball Research, a global fraternity of historians and statisticians united in their devotion to baseball. He loves old baseball stories.

Now he’s told one. His new book, “A Glove and A Prayer,” is a novel that imagines the life of a 1890s baseball vagabond named August Yost. It’s the perfect diversion for baseball fans anchored in the doldrums of sports cancellations caused by coronavirus.

Part of the Plan

Part of the Plan

When it comes to setting goals, Sierra Friend is here to tell you that “there is nothing magical about Jan. 1.

“People always think about creating change around the New Year,” Friend says. “I always tell people, when you say you’re ready to make a change, it doesn’t matter what day it is.”