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Still Tops

Still Tops

No Sacramento neighborhood is perfect, but the Pocket and Greenhaven community comes close. There are abundant shops, services and globally flavored restaurants, three supermarkets, churches, housing opportunities for most budgets, miles of bikeways and expansive, manicured parks.

While other prime neighborhoods such as Land Park, Midtown and East Sacramento struggle with increasing numbers of homeless people and campgrounds, Pocket and Greenhaven generally avoid challenges that come from playing host to unsheltered community members.

Pocket Life February 2021

Pocket Life February 2021

Valentine’s Day brings out friendship and love in many of us. This month’s Pocket Life shares two love stories from local residents as we look to Feb. 14.

What’s it like for seniors to fall in love again? One answer came from Mas Hatano, who Inside readers may remember celebrated his 92nd birthday with a bicycle “ride-by” to avoid problems with COVID-19.

River Of Change

River Of Change

The weight of public authority continues to crush a handful of property owners who fought for decades to keep people away from the Sacramento River levee in Pocket, Greenhaven and Little Pocket.

The latest victory for public access comes from the Central Valley Flood Protection Board, the state agency that owns and controls the levees.

In November, the flood board formally canceled its 1996 policy that permitted nine private fences and gates to block the levee. The old policy allowed property owners to seal off public access and create private playgrounds for themselves along the waterfront. The vote to drop the policy was unanimous.

Eyes Open

Eyes Open

Like many people in Pocket, Little Pocket and Greenhaven, Cassandra Fong is eager to see public access finally come to the Sacramento River Parkway. When she learned Army Corps of Engineers contractors plan to tear down private levee fences that block public access to the parkway, she said, “Hallelujah.”

But Fong wasn’t completely ready to celebrate. She knows the fences have been an eyesore and insult to public accessibility for almost 50 years. And she knows the handful of property owners who control the fences may not accept the fact that the river parkway is finally open.

“Perhaps we need to set up a committee or group of people who will continue to ‘police’ the area so that these same people don’t start building new privately owned encroachments,” she wrote to me.

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