Supporting Community Is Deep in The Roots

Supporting Community Is Deep in The Roots

As the community turns to local food sources instead of the global chain, is it possible Sacramento could dig even deeper into its roots as the farm-to-fork capital?

Small farms across the region that have been impacted by the pandemic are seeing some opportunities. To help support America’s farmers and maintain the integrity of our nation’s food supply chain, the U.S. Department of Agriculture implemented the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program. Announced in mid-April, this $19 billion immediate relief program provides critical assistance to farmers.

Medic Menus

Medic Menus

If coronavirus patients arrive at the Alternate Care Facility in Sleep Train Arena, they won’t have to settle for traditional hospital food. Meals at the old arena—leased by the Kings to the state for $500,000 a month—are provided by Legends Hospitality, the NBA team’s food vendor.

Fair Trade Future

Fair Trade Future

Coffee, as simple as it may sound, is an essential part of many people’s lives. When Gov. Gavin Newsom’s Executive Order in March required all non-essential businesses to cease operations to mitigate the impact of COVID-19, an abrupt halt came to daily routines. No more sitting in cafes sipping hot pour-overs, nor chatting with friends over cranberry scones and lattes.

The mandate threatened not only local businesses, bars and cafes, but also their suppliers such as farmers who sell green coffee beans. Most of Sacramento’s local coffee shops have been able to remain open by offering to-go and curbside-pickup, but the impact has been heavy on coffee roasters and farmers.

Fido & Farmers

Fido & Farmers

It’s a brisk Sunday morning and the farmers market at 8th and W streets is already alive with a confluence of characters. Young families with strollers, college students in knitted sweaters and loyal patrons carrying baskets all buzz from booth to booth collecting organic acorn squash, cage-free brown eggs and lightly bruised oranges.

A young man and woman meander down the center corridor doting over a heap of broccoli with a wagging corgi in tow on a short leash. Passersby gesture to the sandy-colored dog with giddy chuckles and small gasps of amusement. When a balding gentleman in jeans and a plaid jacket strides up and gently pushes a piece of paper into the man’s hand, they all smile politely.

Changes in Latitudes

Changes in Latitudes

UC Davis’ newest restaurant provides the community with one of the most unique university dining experiences. The minds and mouths making the decisions in dining services are nurturing an environment of hand-picked, hyper-local ingredients and flavorful, international dishes in all campus dining—especially in its newest addition, Latitude Restaurant and Market.

Latitude focuses on the diversity of its community by serving scratch-made cuisine from regions around the world. “Our goal is making dining the least stressful and most enjoyable part of the day,” says Kraig Brady, director of dining services.

Diamonds In The Rough

Diamonds In The Rough

Sacramento has had its very own rare gem in Blue Diamond Almonds since 1910 when Blue Diamond Growers made its headquarters at 1802 C St.

When early California pioneers discovered that the soil and climate surrounding the Sacramento area was ideal for growing almonds, it spurred the launch of a grower-owned cooperative—the California Almond Growers Exchange.