Counting Time

Counting Time

Primary voting by mail in Sacramento County is underway and ballots can be cast at Vote Center locations through June 7 when the polls close. Two candidates already know they’re winners. Others must wait for the final tabulation.

County Assessor Christina Wynn and Supervisor Phil Serna drew no opponents, so neither needed to campaign.

Serna hasn’t faced an election battle since his maiden run to succeed Roger Dickinson in 2010, and that race brought token opposition. We can ponder whether Serna will try to move up the political ladder, though history has not favored candidates from the county’s first district.

Let’s Get Moving

Let’s Get Moving

Some people get frustrated when local government tells them something obvious. Not me. I find it satisfying, even comforting, to see a municipal report that validates precisely what I’ve been saying all along.

The Pocket Greenhaven Transportation Plan is one such document. The plan is a big deal, sponsored by the city to establish priorities and expenditures in traffic safety and connectivity for decades to come. The work started before the pandemic. Now it’s nearing the finish line.

Bureaucratic delays, combined with a reluctance to bring large groups together in town halls under COVID-19, slowed the project. Opportunities for public discourse were limited. But final opinions are now being solicited, leaving local City Councilmember Rick Jennings with a clear picture of community traffic priorities.

Out & About December 2021

Out & About December 2021

Out & About By Jessica Laskey December 2021 Make A Difference Volunteers needed to help kids read Help local kids learn to read at grade level by volunteering for United Way California Capital Region’s Students & Tutors Achieving Reading Success program....
Search For Sites

Search For Sites

Every conversation with constituents begins or ends with frustrations over homelessness. That frustration is a major reason I ran for county supervisor. I knew something bold had to happen to help those in need and reduce the impacts to our businesses and neighborhoods.

Government has an obligation to provide safe sleeping areas, sanctioned camping sites, shelters or car camping areas. There is nothing compassionate about allowing someone with untreated mental illness or addiction to live in desperation, filth and squalor. It’s also unfair to residents and business owners who struggle with the impact of homeless encampments.

Going Nowhere

Going Nowhere

Abandoned cars don’t hide well. They are filthy from sitting in the wind and sun.

Windows are covered with dust. Tires slump as the air slowly drains away. Cobwebs grow in wheel wells. Anyone walking past can tell, yes, no doubt, there’s an abandoned car.

Pocket and Land Park have never been known for attracting large numbers of abandoned cars, but this historical trend is shifting. In recent months, abandoned cars have been found on Havenside Drive, Greenhaven Drive and 43rd Avenue. A resident named Duwayne Brooks, who enjoys daily neighborhood walks of about 1½ miles near his Pocket home, tells me he has found more than 30 abandoned cars in recent weeks.

Forward Steps

Forward Steps

The homelessness crisis continues to grow. My office receives more calls, emails and online posts about this issue than any other.

The growing population of people living unsheltered on our streets, parks and open spaces brings human suffering to our doorsteps and represents a failure of government to provide safe and sanitary shelter and meaningful treatment programs for addiction and mental illness.